Ohio’s nursing homes can begin outdoor visitation beginning July 20

Beginning July 20, Ohio nursing homes are permitted to begin outdoor visitation, so long as all safety standards are met, Gov. Mike DeWine announced Monday. The state’s assisted living facilities and intermediate care facilities began to allow outdoor visitation in early June. Due to the success here, the governor said his administration has decided to expand to the state’s nursing homes. When assessing their readiness to permit outdoor visitation, nursing homes should consider a variety of things, the governor said, including: case status in community; case status in nursing home; staffing levels; access to adequate testing for residents/staff; personal protective equipment supplies; and hospital capacity.”We are confident that our approach provides each facility the flexibility needed to assess their readiness to safely facilitate outdoor visitation — and to do so in a transparent way that keeps residents and families informed,” DeWine said. “My job as governor is to protect all Ohioans. Part of that job means putting measures in place to keep people safe from COVID-19. It also means protecting those things that add value to life. Balance has been and remains the operative word in our efforts.”Anyone with questions about visiting loved ones can contact the State Long-Term Care Ombudsman, an office within the Ohio Department of Aging, at 1-800-282-1206.This is a developing story. WLWT will update this story as details develop.

Beginning July 20, Ohio nursing homes are permitted to begin outdoor visitation, so long as all safety standards are met, Gov. Mike DeWine announced Monday.

The state’s assisted living facilities and intermediate care facilities began to allow outdoor visitation in early June. Due to the success here, the governor said his administration has decided to expand to the state’s nursing homes.

When assessing their readiness to permit outdoor visitation, nursing homes should consider a variety of things, the governor said, including: case status in community; case status in nursing home; staffing levels; access to adequate testing for residents/staff; personal protective equipment supplies; and hospital capacity.

“We are confident that our approach provides each facility the flexibility needed to assess their readiness to safely facilitate outdoor visitation — and to do so in a transparent way that keeps residents and families informed,” DeWine said. “My job as governor is to protect all Ohioans. Part of that job means putting measures in place to keep people safe from COVID-19. It also means protecting those things that add value to life. Balance has been and remains the operative word in our efforts.”

Anyone with questions about visiting loved ones can contact the State Long-Term Care Ombudsman, an office within the Ohio Department of Aging, at 1-800-282-1206.

This is a developing story. WLWT will update this story as details develop.